Tag Archives | Hydroelectric Power

NDTV’s We The People – On the Uttarakhand floods

Last Sunday, I appeared on NDTV’s We The People hosted by Barkha Dutt, to talk about the recent floods in Uttarakhand and on the “eco-insensitive” nature of politics in India. Here’s a clip of the comments I made during the show. You can watch the full recording at the NDTV website.

I also had the opportunity to underscore the same points during an interview by Maseeh Rahman of The Guardian.

But most analysts believe restricting the number of pilgrims would be political suicide. “The desire to worship at Kedarnath is almost like an irresistible force,” said Pavan Srinath, of the Chennai-based thinktank Takshashila Foundation. “Despite the tragedy, people are already talking about when they will undertake the sacred journey. No government can bar the devout from the Himalayas.”

Not all experts are in agreement. Srinath maintains that the devastation would have been even more widespread if the reservoir of the region’s biggest dam at Tehri had not contained a significant volume of the deluge. “Dams can also prevent disasters,” he said. “The critical issue is not dams, but proper dam management. In India, we just don’t have a culture of public safety.”
[The Guardian, June 28, 2013]

The comment the regulation of pilgrims, however, isn’t just about political feasibility – but about policy realism. In all likelihood, a strict regulation of official pilgrims to the holy sites will lead to a large number of illegal traffic of tourists and pilgrims, with much less safety.

Also, this blogger thinks that it’s more likely that the Tehri dam was empty and capable of receiving flood waters more by circumstance than by intent – nevertheless, it demonstrates the positive role well-managed dams can play in disaster risk reduction.

Related posts: Not every disaster is man-made | We are still vulnerable to climate variability

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Reaping what we sowed

On July 30, the lights went out all over North India, but that statement hides as much as it reveals. For many people in India, power supply (let alone uninterrupted power supply) is a distant dream. Many others prepare for outages in private, investing in diesel generators, inverters and more.

It is much harder, however, to build contingencies for something like the Delhi Metro. With Delhi crying out for power,

A Delhi Metro official said they received hydel power from Bhutan on a priority basis, and added that Delhi Metro was amongst the emergency services, including the Prime Minister’s residence and the All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), that were provided power. [When the lights went out

Apart from re-allocating power from the eastern and western grids, power bought from Bhutan helped India’s ailing infrastructure in a time of great need.

Much as we need to thank Bhutan for this, Indian foreign policy efforts over the last decade have played a crucial role in enabling this to happen. India has helped Bhutan set up three hydroelectric projects that are currently operational: a 1020 MW project at Tala, a 336 MW project at Chukha and a 60 MW project at Kurichhu, adding up to a total of 1,416 MW. July 30 was a day when India’s foreign aid efforts abroad overtly showed its benefits.

Bhutan is one of India’s close strategic and economic partners, and has been the single largest recipient of foreign aid going out India in the last decade. Apart from funding (and helping construct) hydroelectric power projects, India has also helped Bhutan in setting up cement industries, electricity transmission and distribution networks, highways and more. Below is a graph of annual estimates of development assistance provided to Bhutan by India, at constant and current prices. In 2008, Dr. Manmohan Singh visited the country, a year after India and Bhutan’s ‘Treaty of Friendship’ was renegotiated and signed. Aid efforts appear to have been stepped up since then.

India’s energy needs are increasing rapidly, but domestic ability to match that need has been insufficient. While India has found it difficult to set up hydroelectric power projects in Arunachal Pradesh, in Bhutan it finds a willing partner. Together, they are targeting 10,000 MW of power generation by 2020, with Indian plans of buying about half of it, or 5,000 MW of power for domestic consumption.

The 5,000 MW will constitute a small but essential step towards India’s goal of energy sufficiency.

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